Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
English Presbyterianism 1590–1640$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Polly Ha

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780804759878

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804759878.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 25 September 2021

Anti-Episcopacy

Anti-Episcopacy

Chapter:
(p.21) Chapter 2 Anti-Episcopacy
Source:
English Presbyterianism 1590–1640
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804759878.003.0003

This chapter describes the long-standing opposition of English Presbyterianism to episcopacy. They challenged the very nature of episcopacy and made extensive arguments against the civil powers that the bishops claimed. English presbyterians also argued that episcopacy was not only unbiblical but unnatural. Concern for a preaching ministry was integral to attacks against episcopacy during the early seventeenth century. The puritans' legal opposition to the Church coincided with the height of the conflict between presbyterians and defenders of episcopacy. English presbyterians visualized their ecclesiastical reform as both local and national. Furthermore, presbyterian critique of episcopal jurisdiction could drive out a wider intellectual and organizational opposition to it, not simply by directing such criticism to parliament but also to counties, towns, and parishes.

Keywords:   episcopacy, English Presbyterianism, preaching ministry, English presbyterians, ecclesiastical reform, episcopal jurisdiction

Stanford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.