Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
On Ethics and HistoryEssays and Letters of Zhang Xuecheng$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Philip J. Ivanhoe

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780804761284

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804761284.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 04 June 2020

A Treatise on Teachers1

A Treatise on Teachers1

Chapter:
(p.52) Essay 3 A Treatise on Teachers1
Source:
On Ethics and History
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804761284.003.0003

This chapter presents the English translation of an essay by Zhang, which is an explicit response to Han Yu's well-known essay with the same title. Against Han Yu, Zhang argues that the highest kinds of knowledge can only be acquired from certain very special kinds of teachers. Zhang develops this idea into an intriguing distinction between replaceable and irreplaceable teachers. One can learn facts and techniques from the former, but if one is interested in the sense, style, and significance of the dao, one must seek the latter: a teacher who personally embodies this knowledge. Moreover, irreplaceable teachers can communicate this more esoteric type of wisdom only through direct and intimate interactions with their students or disciples. Invoking the style as well as the language of Chan Buddhism, Zhang insists on a “mind-to-mind transmission” of the Confucian dao.

Keywords:   Zhang Xuecheng, essay, Han Yu, teachers, Confucian dao, Chan Buddhism

Stanford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.