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In Your FaceProfessional Improprieties and the Art of Being Conspicuous in Sixteenth-Century Italy$
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Douglas Biow

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780804762151

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804762151.001.0001

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Epilogue

Epilogue

Chapter:
(p.187) Epilogue
Source:
In Your Face
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804762151.003.0007

This chapter offers some final caveats on Renaissance self-fashioning by looking at men who were represented, or represented themselves, as flouting on the grand scale the niceties of decorum in sixteenth-century Italy. It notes that artists like Benvenuto Cellini and Michelangelo Buonarroti are quite exceptional among the larger group of practitioners in the period. They were able to create a demand for their products that was extraregional and associated with their particular virtuosity and expertise. The artists described in this book helped redefine what it meant behaviorally to be someone in a profession in sixteenth-century Italy. In the process, they invested themselves in often novel and exciting ways in their visual and verbal art.

Keywords:   sixteenth-century Italy, Renaissance self-fashioning, Benvenuto Cellini, Michelangelo Buonarroti

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