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Paths to PeaceDomestic Coalition Shifts, War Termination and the Korean War$
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Elizabeth A. Stanley

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780804762694

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804762694.001.0001

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War Termination in Theory and Practice

War Termination in Theory and Practice

Chapter:
(p.272) 10 War Termination in Theory and Practice
Source:
Paths to Peace
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804762694.003.0010

This chapter draws out the larger theoretical and policy implications of the argument. It explains the potential ways to extend the research, such as explicitly modeling third-party intervention and extending the analysis to civil wars. A coalition shift can assist in overtaking the obstacles to peace and thus allows the war to end. There are six implications of domestic coalition shift theory, ranging from narrow observations about bargaining models of war to broad ramifications about any major policy change. Policy recommendations are classified by obstacles to peace, with final categories concerned with coalitional dynamics and the strategic interaction process. These obstacles include the preference obstacle, information obstacle, and entrapment obstacle. Analysis about coalitional dynamics provides some lessons about coalition-making tactics in the process of ending war.

Keywords:   civil wars, domestic coalition shift, bargaining models of war, policy recommendations, peace, preference obstacle, information obstacle, entrapment obstacle

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