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Male ConfessionsIntimate Revelations and the Religious Imagination$
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Bjorn Krondorfer

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780804768993

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804768993.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 21 October 2019

Outlook

Outlook

The Power to Name Oneself into Being

Chapter:
(p.231) Chapter 8 Outlook
Source:
Male Confessions
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804768993.003.0008

This book has explored how men present, perform, and reflect upon themselves through confessions. The male confessant invests in particular self-revelations and in particular choices of opening himself up to the public, in a manner that is multivocal, manifold, densely enriched, ambiguous, and at times contradictory. The narrower his presentation of himself (such as Oswald Pohl or Donald Boisvert), the less trustworthy the testimony that his leaves of himself. The deeper the male confessant's presentation of himself (like St. Augustine and Calel Perechodnik), the less solipsistic the male gazing. The book has also argued that the religious imagination can transcend the confines of the mirror's surface and can give rise to an interiority in which the soul is naked in the face of another. It has also discussed moral agency, the (heterosexual) male body, the intimate (female) other, and the “becomingness” through sexual practices, as well as the political dimension of the intersection of masculinity, religion, and nation building, in men's confessions.

Keywords:   men, confessions, testimony, moral agency, religious imagination, masculinity, nation building, male body, sexual practices, religion

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