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Economic Evolution and Revolution in Historical Time$

Paul W. Rhode, Joshua L. Rosenbloom, and David F. Weiman

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780804771856

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804771856.001.0001

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(p.ix) Contributors

(p.ix) Contributors

Source:
Economic Evolution and Revolution in Historical Time
Publisher:
Stanford University Press

  • JEREMY ATACK is Professor of Economics and History at Vanderbilt University, Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research, and former coeditor of the Journal of Economic History. His recent publications include The Origins and Development of Financial Markets and Institutions (2009, coedited with Larry Neal) and coauthored papers in the Economic History Review (2005), Explorations in Economic History (2008), and Social Science History (2010).

  • LEONARD A. CARLSON is Associate Professor of Economics at Emory University. His previous publications include “Indian Removal, ‘Squatterism,’ and Slavery: Economic Interests and the Passage of the Indian Removal Act of 1830,” Explorations in Economic History (2006) and Indians, Bureaucrats and Land: The Dawes Act and the Decline of Indian Farming (1981).

  • SUSAN B. CARTER is Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Riverside. She is one of the general editors of Historical Statistics of the United States, Millennial Edition (2006) and editor of the chapters on labor, immigration, cohorts, and utilities.

  • KAREN CLAY is Associate Professor of Economics at the Heinz College, Carnegie Mellon University. Her previous (coauthored) work on natural resources includes “Migrating to Riches? Evidence from the California Gold Rush,” Journal of Economic History (2008) and “Order without Law? Property Rights during the California Gold Rush,” Explorations in Economic History (2005).

  • ROBERT K. FLECK is Professor of Economics at Montana State University. His recent publications include work on the New Deal (Journal of (p.x) Political Economy, 2008), joint work with F. Andrew Hanssen on democracy and women's rights in ancient Greece (Journal of Law and Economics, 2006; Economics of Governance, 2009), and joint work with Christopher Kilby on foreign aid (Journal of Development Economics, 2010).

  • ROB GILLEZEAU is a doctoral candidate in the Department of Economics at the University of Michigan. He is writing a dissertation on the impact of the Community Action Program on the 1960s race riots and the development of the American labor movement during World War II.

  • GEORGE GRANTHAM is Professor Emeritus of Economics at McGill University. His recent publications include “Explaining the Industrial Transition: A Non-Malthusian Perspective,” European Review of Economic History (2008); “The Industrious Revolution and Labour Force Participation of Rural Women: Evidence from Mid-Nineteenth-Century France,” in The Birth of Modern Europe: Culture and Economy 1400–1800, edited by Laura Cruz (2010); and “What's Space Got to Do with It? Distance and Agricultural Productivity before the Railway Age,” Journal of Economic History (forthcoming).

  • MICHAEL HAINES is the Banfi Vintners Professor of Economics at Colgate University. Besides his joint work with Jeremy Atack and Robert A. Margo, his recent publications in the area of historical demography appeared in Economics and Human Biology (2008), Demography (2008), and Review of Economics and Statistics (2007).

  • STACEY M. JONES is Senior Lecturer in the Albers School of Business and Economics at Seattle University. Her research is on the historical development of the labor force in the United States, focusing on education, gender, and inequality.

  • FRANK LEVY is a labor economist in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Department of Urban Studies and Planning. His recent publications include “How Technology Changes Demands for Human Skills,” OECD Directorate for Education Working Paper (2010), and (p.xi) “Offshoring Professional Services: Institutions and Professional Control,” British Journal of Industrial Relations (forthcoming).

  • ROBERT A. MARGO is Professor and Chair in the Department of Economics at Boston University and a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He is the author of Race and Schooling in the South, 1880–1950: An Economic History (1990) and Wages and Labor Markets in the United States, 1820–1860 (2000).

  • ALAN L. OLMSTEAD is Distinguished Research Professor of Economics and a member of the Giannini Foundation of Agricultural Economics at the University of California, Davis. He is one of the general editors of Historical Statistics of the United States, Millennial Edition (2006), and coauthor (with Paul W. Rhode) of Creating Abundance: Biological Innovation and American Agricultural Development (2008).

  • SCOTT A. REDENIUS is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Economics at Brandeis University. His recent publications include “Designing a National Currency: Antebellum Payment Networks and the Structure of the National Banking System,” Financial History Review (2007) and “New National Bank Loan Rate Estimates, 1887–1975,” Research in Economic History (2007).

  • PAUL W. RHODE is Professor of Economics at the University of Michigan and a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He is coauthor (with Alan Olmstead) of Creating Abundance: Biological Innovation and American Agricultural Development (2008) and coeditor (with Gianni Toniolo) of The Global Economy in the 1990s: A Long-Run Perspective (2006).

  • JOSHUA L. ROSENBLOOM is Professor of Economics and Associate Vice Provost for Research and Graduate Studies at the University of Kansas, and a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He recently edited Quantitative Economic History: The Good of Counting (2008), and he is the author of Looking for Work, Searching for (p.xii) Workers: Labor Markets during American Industrialization (2002) as well as numerous articles on the historical development of U.S. labor markets.

  • WILLIAM A. SUNDSTROM is Professor of Economics at Santa Clara University. He is the author of numerous articles, including “The Geography of Wage Discrimination in the Pre–Civil Rights South,” Journal of Economic History (2007), and coeditor (with Timothy Guinnane and Warren Whatley) of History Matters: Essays on Economic Growth, Technology, and Demographic Change (2004).

  • RICHARD SUTCH is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Economics at the University of California, Riverside and a Research Associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. He is one of the general editors of Historical Statistics of the United States, Millennial Edition (2006), and editor of the chapters on national income, business cycles, savings, slavery, immigration, industrial classification, and the courts and criminal justice.

  • PETER TEMIN is Gray Professor Emeritus of Economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His most recent (coauthored) books are The World Economy between the World Wars (2008) and Reasonable RX: Solving the Drug Price Crisis (2008).

  • TA-CHEN WANG is Assistant Professor of Economics at California State University, Sacramento. His recent publications include “Paying Back to Borrow More: Reputation and Bank Credit Access in Early America,” Explorations in Economic History (2008), and “Banks, Credit Markets, and Early American Development—A Case Study of Entry and Competition,” Journal of Economic History (2008).

  • DAVID F. WEIMAN is Alena Wels Hirschorn '58 Professor of Economics at Barnard College and an affiliated member of Columbia University's History Department. His recent coauthored publications include “From Drafts to Checks: The Evolution of Correspondent Banking Networks (p.xiii) and the Formation of the Modern U.S. Payments System,” Journal of Money, Credit, and Banking (2010), and “The Political Economy of the U.S. Monetary Union: The Civil War Era as a Watershed,” American Economic Review, Papers and Proceedings (2007).

  • WARREN C. WHATLEY is Professor of Economics at the University of Michigan. His recent publications include “The Most Significant Racial Integration in American History,” Labor History (2007), and History Matters: Essays on Economic Growth, Technology, and Demographic Change (coedited with Timothy Guinnane and William Sundstrom, 2004).

  • SUSAN WOLCOTT is Associate Professor of Economics at Binghamton University. Her most recent publications include “An Examination of the Supply of Financial Credit to Entrepreneurs in Colonial India,” in The Invention of Enterprise, edited by David S. Landes, Joel Mokyr, and William J. Baumol (2009), and “Strikes in Colonial India, 1921–1938,” Industrial and Labor Relations Review (2008).

  • GAVIN WRIGHT is the William Robertson Coe Professor of American Economic History at Stanford University, where he has taught since 1982. His latest publication (with Gary R. Saxonhouse) is “National Leadership and Competing Technological Paradigms: The Globalization of Cotton Spinning, 1878–1933,”Journal of Economic History (2010). Professor Wright has a long-standing interest in the economy of the American South and has published three books on that subject, most recently Slavery and American Economic Development (2006). (p.xiv)