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Special RelationsThe Americanization of Britain?$
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Howard Malchow

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780804773997

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804773997.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 12 November 2019

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Special Relations
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804773997.003.0001

This book addresses the reaction of Britain to American popular culture. The phenomena of special postwar cultural relations that this study considers include the prospect of the Manhattanization of the London cityscape in the late 1950s, anti-American protest in the 1960s, Anglo-American Pop, rock, and utopian counterculture, the radical politics of liberation in the late 1960s and early 1970s, and the transatlantic construction of “heritage Britain” in the decade that followed. American popular culture has been a transformative engine of great power. The special nature of Anglo-American cultural relations from the 1950s to the 1970s is then described. It is shown that the transatlantic contact multiplied the short-stay and long-stay tourism, the back-and-forth of professional (commercial, financial, and academic) travel. American visitors have significantly played a role in Anglo-American cultural relations. Furthermore, the effect of American television on transatlantic travel is discussed.

Keywords:   American popular culture, Britain, London, radical politics, Anglo-American cultural relations, transatlantic contact, American television, anti-American protest, liberation

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