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Special RelationsThe Americanization of Britain?$
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Howard Malchow

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780804773997

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804773997.001.0001

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London, USA?

London, USA?

Chapter:
(p.27) Chapter 1 London, USA?
Source:
Special Relations
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804773997.003.0002

This chapter discusses American architectural modernism in London through additions that drew significant media attention, contestation, and public awareness—such as the Hilton Hotel on Park Lane. It starts by addressing some key sites of modern architecture in the 1950s and early 1960s. The Hilton is usually regarded as the precursor of a vertical revolution. The Hilton Hotel chain became a charged motif of spreading American influence and presence abroad. The anticipation of success by the Hilton in Europe rested on shrewd predictions of the expanding and expandable market for accommodation from tourists and business travelers. Furthermore, there were concerns about the effect of high-rise modernism before the completion of the Hilton tower. These concerns had helped to produce a discourse of concern that gathered power with the completion of major project throughout the period.

Keywords:   modern architecture, American architectural modernism, London, Hilton Hotel, Park Lane, Hilton tower

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