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Silencing the SeaSecular Rhythms in Palestinian Poetry$
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Khaled Furani

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780804776462

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804776462.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 19 September 2019

Modern Poets and “Conservative” People

Modern Poets and “Conservative” People

Chapter:
(p.154) 9 Modern Poets and “Conservative” People
Source:
Silencing the Sea
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804776462.003.0010

With a mixture of nationalist, communist, and socialist voices, Nazareth used to be a venue in which to speak about redemption through Arab nationalism or communist internationalism. This chapter focuses on how Arabic poetry in general and Palestinian poetry in particular is secularized and how modern Arab poets such as Edmoun Shehadeh, Ahmad Kiwan, 'Abd al- Karim Abu Khashan, Muhammad al-Batrawi, and Ahmad Dahbour push secularism into the Arab literary imagination. Shehadeh's road to his free verse poetry was paved by Iraqi poets such as Nazik al-Mala'ika and Badr Shakir al-Sayyab. Kiwan was dismayed by the Palestinian and Arabic poetry scene.

Keywords:   nationalism, Arabic poetry, Palestinian poetry, poets, secularism, free verse, Edmoun Shehadeh, Ahmad Kiwan, Muhammad al-Batrawi, Ahmad Dahbour

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