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Hispanic Entrepreneurs in the 2000sAn Economic Profile and Policy Implications$
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Alberto Davila and Marie T. Mora

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780804777933

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804777933.001.0001

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Strategic Issues for Hispanic Entrepreneurs—Credit Access

Strategic Issues for Hispanic Entrepreneurs—Credit Access

Chapter:
(p.102) 6 Strategic Issues for Hispanic Entrepreneurs—Credit Access
Source:
Hispanic Entrepreneurs in the 2000s
Author(s):

Alberto Dávila

Marie T. Mora

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804777933.003.0006

This chapter addresses how Hispanic entrepreneurs fared with regards to accessing credit in the first decade of the 2000s. Hispanic entrepreneurs were more likely than their non-Hispanic counterparts to report the inability to acquire the financial capital they needed to expand or improve their operations; they also appeared to face other credit-access barriers in the form of relatively small loan amounts and high interest rates. In addition to considering the role of discrimination, this chapter discusses how these findings could relate to cultural forces, including how Hispanics seem to be relatively conservative in their credit demands and less likely to trust traditional methods of financing, such as bank loans.

Keywords:   Hispanic credit access, Hispanic access to financial capital, Hispanic trust in banks, Loans to Hispanic-owned businesses, Discrimination in credit markets

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