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Violence, Coercion, and State-Making in Twentieth-Century MexicoThe Other Half of the Centaur$
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Wil G. Pansters

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780804781589

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804781589.001.0001

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Political Practice, Everyday Political Violence, and Electoral Processes During the Neoliberal Period in Mexico

Political Practice, Everyday Political Violence, and Electoral Processes During the Neoliberal Period in Mexico

Chapter:
(p.212) Chapter Nine Political Practice, Everyday Political Violence, and Electoral Processes During the Neoliberal Period in Mexico
Source:
Violence, Coercion, and State-Making in Twentieth-Century Mexico
Author(s):

Kathy Powell

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804781589.003.0009

Mexico's social and political history has been characterized by violence that apparently intensified with the “democratization” processes of the neoliberal period. Structural violence has given rise to historically embedded political, social, and material impoverishment, inequalities and exclusions that grew even worse under neoliberalism. This chapter examines the role of multiple forms of violence and coercion in the relations of power that underlie clientelism in Mexican politics. It first explores how clientelism operates in political processes—that is, its convergence with bureaucratic indifference, corruption, and coercion. It then considers how these political cultural practices and discursive products have confronted and constructed political opposition, as seen in elections during Carlos Salinas's sexennial and in the 2006 presidential elections. It also shows how coercion, patronage, and corruption have persisted as part of attempts to influence electoral outcomes, while hierarchic discourses on popular violence are exploited to discredit and derail the opposition.

Keywords:   violence, clientelism, coercion, corruption, politics, elections, political opposition, neoliberalism, Carlos Salinas

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