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Determined to Succeed?Performance versus Choice in Educational Attainment$
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Michelle Jackson

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780804783026

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: June 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804783026.001.0001

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Academic Achievement, Tracking Decisions, and Their Relative Contribution to Educational Inequalities

Academic Achievement, Tracking Decisions, and Their Relative Contribution to Educational Inequalities

Change over Four Decades in France

Chapter:
(p.116) Chapter Five Academic Achievement, Tracking Decisions, and Their Relative Contribution to Educational Inequalities
Source:
Determined to Succeed?
Author(s):

Mathieu Ichou

Louis-André Vallet

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804783026.003.0005

This chapter presents analyses of IEO in France for cohorts spanning 30 years, assesses inequalities related to both parental class and education, and comments on inequalities related to gender and ethnicity. In France, upper-class families' demand for the two components of the academic track of higher education, university and classes préparatoires, has dramatically changed over time. In the course of pupils' educational careers, secondary effects generally increase relative to primary effects. There is a clear historical rise in the share of the primary effects of social stratification in creating educational differentials.

Keywords:   France education, France IEO, gender inequality, school transitions, social stratification

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