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A Political History of National Citizenship and Identity in Italy, 1861-1950$
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Sabina Donati

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780804784511

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804784511.001.0001

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“Becoming Visible”

“Becoming Visible”

Italian Women and Their Male Co-Citizens in the Liberal State

Chapter:
(p.36) (p.37) Chapter Two “Becoming Visible”
Source:
A Political History of National Citizenship and Identity in Italy, 1861-1950
Author(s):
Sabina Donati
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804784511.003.0003

“Becoming Visible”: Italian Women and Their Male Co-Citizens in the Liberal State

Keywords:   Chapter abstract: This chapter examines the citizenship policies and discourses formulated in Italy in reference to women and their counterpart during the liberal decades. Arguing that womanhood and manhood are relational categories, and that women need to be made “visible” in citizenship histories, the chapter presents the female and male perspectives together. It explores issues of loss of nationality upon marriage and irrelevance of maternal jus sanguinis as well as outlines the female and male paths to civic inclusion with a focus on civil, political and social rights. Drawing on gender studies, it surveys notions of family union, social order, and morality; and includes parallels and contrasts with British and French citizenship traditions. Subsequently, the discussion is enriched with current scholarly debate on the presence and persistence of racial thinking throughout the entire liberal epoch vis-à-vis Southern Italians and Italian Jews-both perceived in certain quarters as “internal Others”, Italian citizenship, nationality, rights, gender, women, men, internal Others, Southern Italians, Italian Jews, italianità

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