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A Political History of National Citizenship and Identity in Italy, 1861-1950$
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Sabina Donati

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780804784511

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804784511.001.0001

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“O migranti o briganti” Italian Emigration and Nationality Policies in the Peninsula

“O migranti o briganti” Italian Emigration and Nationality Policies in the Peninsula

Chapter:
(p.94) (p.95) Chapter FourO migranti o brigantiItalian Emigration and Nationality Policies in the Peninsula
Source:
A Political History of National Citizenship and Identity in Italy, 1861-1950
Author(s):
Sabina Donati
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804784511.003.0005

This chapter details liberal Italy’s citizenship debates and changes of policy pertaining to the national membership status of Italian emigrants abroad and their descendants. After providing an overview of the migratory flows that left the peninsula during the decades between 1876 and 1914, the chapter surveys issues of naturalization abroad, loss of Italian citizenship at home, and dual citizenship in order to discuss the situation of first-generation emigrants and the institutional responses of the sending country. Subsequently, moving to the second generations issued from Italian emigration and settled abroad, it examines the use of jus soli and jus sanguinis within a context of permanent diasporas, and discusses the policy changes concerning these offspring. Drawing on state discourses, it also shows that “citizenship” and “nationality” were not synonymous terms for Italian authorities-acquiring peculiar historical meanings. Occasionally, some comparisons are also made with the German, French, and British case studies.

Keywords:   Italian emigration, diaspora, second generations, Italian citizenship, nationality, dual citizenship, jus soli, jus sanguinis, national identity, italianità

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