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A Political History of National Citizenship and Identity in Italy, 1861-1950$
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Sabina Donati

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780804784511

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804784511.001.0001

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Liberal Italy’s Expansionism and Citizenship Issues (1880s–1922)

Liberal Italy’s Expansionism and Citizenship Issues (1880s–1922)

Colonial Subjects, Citizens of Tripolitania and Cyrenaica and Dodecanesini

Chapter:
(p.118) (p.119) Chapter Five Liberal Italy’s Expansionism and Citizenship Issues (1880s–1922)
Source:
A Political History of National Citizenship and Identity in Italy, 1861-1950
Author(s):
Sabina Donati
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804784511.003.0006

This chapter provides a comprehensive account of the citizenship policies that were introduced during the liberal decades by an expanding colonial Italy vis-à-vis the native populations in Eritrea, Somalia, Libya and the Aegean Islands. In this way the still relatively unknown citizenship issues of occupied Dodecanese are fully discussed for the first time with the citizenship situation of Italy’s African subjects, on which there is already a substantial literature. Drawing on official discourse and current scholarship pertaining to colonial subjecthood, the chapter also explores the liberal variant of notions of “civilization” and “race” as they were extended from the peninsula to the African natives. It brings to light the historical reference of the “myth of Rome” as it was evoked in the citizenship debates about Eritreans, Somalis and Libyans as well as the historical paradigm of the “maritime Republics” suggested in discussions about the Dodecanesini.

Keywords:   Italian colonial subjecthood, Italian colonial citizenship, Eritrea, Somalia, Libya, Dodecanese, civilization, race, “myth of Rome”, maritime Republics

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