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From Social Movement to Moral MarketHow the Circuit Riders Sparked an IT Revolution and Created a Technology Market$
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Paul-Brian McInerney

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780804785129

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804785129.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
From Social Movement to Moral Market
Author(s):

Paul-Brian McInerney

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804785129.003.0001

This chapter explains how social movements can create moral markets out of their activities and the ambivalence that arises out of such outcomes. When social movements create and shape markets, they attempt to imbue such markets with social values they consider important, such as environmentalism or social justice. But which values eventually take hold? And how? This chapter addresses these questions by explaining three important actions in the creation of markets and movements alike. Establishing worth entails getting actors to recognize the value of one’s endeavors. Organizing creates stable relationships and meanings and channels the efforts of others toward achieving collective goals. Coordination is about figuring out appropriate modes of orientation toward other actors.

Keywords:   Moral Markets, Social Movements, Worth, Organizing, Coordination, Conventions, Social Values, Organizing

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