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Competition Law and Development$
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Daniel D. Sokol, Thomas K. Cheng, and Ioannis Lianos

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780804785716

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804785716.001.0001

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Resource Constraints and Competition Law Enforcement

Resource Constraints and Competition Law Enforcement

Theoretical Considerations and Observations from Selected Cross-Country Data

Chapter:
(p.90) 6 Resource Constraints and Competition Law Enforcement
Source:
Competition Law and Development
Author(s):

Vivek Ghosal

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804785716.003.0007

This chapter examines optimal structure and enforcement patterns of competition law enforcement agencies. Controlling for the size of the economy, larger agency size is not necessarily optimal. Highly developed economies are observed to have comparatively smaller agencies. This is likely driven by relatively better allocation of human capital, and reaping economies of scale and scope in utilization of scarce enforcement and investigative inputs. An important deficiency that prevents better understanding of enforcement patterns and institutional characteristics across countries relates to significant gaps in relevant data. International organizations such as ICN and OECD can meaningfully contribute in alleviating this deficiency.

Keywords:   competition law enforcement, resource constraints, political-economy, institutional structure, regulatory independence, cross-country data

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