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The Expanding Spaces of LawA Timely Legal Geography$
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Irus Braverman, Nicholas Blomley, and David Delaney

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780804787185

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804787185.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 21 September 2019

Places That Come and Go

Places That Come and Go

A Legal Anthropological Perspective on the Temporalities of Space in Plural Legal Orders

Chapter:
(p.30) 1 Places That Come and Go
Source:
The Expanding Spaces of Law
Author(s):

Franz von Benda-Beckmann

Keebet von Benda-Beckmann

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804787185.003.0002

This chapter argues that including the analysis of legal plurality with a pronounced emphasis on time may provide legal geography with a deeper understanding of the volatile and contradictory nature of legal space making and of the uncertainties with which the subjects of spatial regulation have to live. It is argued that legal spaces and places are not merely relative in time and vary in permanence; they move and alternate with other spaces and at different paces. An anthropological perspective on space and law offers insight into the different ways in which people perceive these time-spaces and navigate among the various authorities. The period in which spaces emerge and disappear but are not yet (or no longer officially) in place is therefore of special interest. Finally, the chapter discusses the paradox that results from hyperterritoriality and hyperregulation, by which intended certainty in fact generates legal ambiguity.

Keywords:   acceleration, hyperterritoriality, legal anthropology, legal pluralism, legal (un)certainty, space and time

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