Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Endurance and WarThe National Sources of Military Cohesion$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jasen J. Castillo

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780804789103

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804789103.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 24 October 2019

Germany, 1944–45

Germany, 1944–45

Chapter:
(p.44) 3 Germany, 1944–45
Source:
Endurance and War
Author(s):

Jasen J. Castillo

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804789103.003.0003

Chapter three examines Germany in World War II and World War I. The cohesion of German armed forces varied greatly between the two World Wars. The tenacity of the messianic German Army in World War II offers compelling evidence in support of cohesion theory; a high degree of organization autonomy bolstered military cohesion. This chapter then compares the performance of the German Army from 1917 to 1918 with the Wehrmacht of World War II, arguing that the combination of a high degree of organizational autonomy but low degree of regime control produced a professional military in Wilhelmine Germany. Chapter keywords: cohesion theory, military cohesion, World War II, Germany, Wehrmacht, messianic military, World War I, professional military, Wilhelmine Germany

Keywords:   cohesion theory, military cohesion, staying power, battlefield performance, collective action, regime control, organizational autonomy, small-group theory, nationalism, democracy

Stanford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.