Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Continuity Despite ChangeThe Politics of Labor Regulation in Latin America$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Matthew E. Carnes

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780804789431

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804789431.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 29 February 2020

Explaining Enduring Labor Codes in Developing Countries: Skill Distributions and the Organizational Capacity of Labor

Explaining Enduring Labor Codes in Developing Countries: Skill Distributions and the Organizational Capacity of Labor

Chapter:
(p.19) Chapter 1 Explaining Enduring Labor Codes in Developing Countries: Skill Distributions and the Organizational Capacity of Labor
Source:
Continuity Despite Change
Author(s):

Matthew E. Carnes

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804789431.003.0001

This chapter builds a general theory of labor regulation. It describes the labor law “policy space” and articulates a typology of four hypothetical labor law “regimes.” It traces the origins to these regimes to two explanatory variables: (1) the distribution of skills in the economy, and (2) the ability of labor to organize to represent its interests. It argues that these factors played a critical role in shaping the earliest state efforts at regulating labor relations in Latin America, beginning in the late 1800s and early 1900s. It then develops a series of arguments about how skill distributions and labor organization functioned under successive waves of economic policy. During industrialization (as occurred in the middle of the twentieth century), they shaped the expansion of coverage of labor regulation. And under globalization (at the turn of the millennium), they constrained – and in many cases, severely limited – the extent of liberalizing reforms.

Keywords:   Latin America, labor laws, policy space, individual labor regulation, collective labor regulation, corporatism, professionalism, markets, skills, unions

Stanford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.