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Negotiating China's Destiny in World War II$
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Hans van de Ven, Diana Lary, and Stephen MacKinnon

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780804789660

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804789660.001.0001

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The Evolution of the Relationship between the Chinese Communist Party and the Comintern during the Sino-Japanese War

The Evolution of the Relationship between the Chinese Communist Party and the Comintern during the Sino-Japanese War

Chapter:
(p.70) 4 The Evolution of the Relationship between the Chinese Communist Party and the Comintern during the Sino-Japanese War
Source:
Negotiating China's Destiny in World War II
Author(s):

Yang Kuisong

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804789660.003.0005

During WWII, Stalin’s policy in East Asia aimed at drawing Japan into a quagmire in China so as to avoid fighting a war on two fronts. This meant supporting the Nationalists in China, the only force capable of providing serious resistance to the Japanese. However, the Soviets naturally also maintained relations with the Chinese Communists. Yang Kuisong analyzes how the CCP managed the frequently difficult relationship with the Soviets and how Mao Zedong was able to maintain a delicate balance between preserving the interest of the Chinese Communists and accommodating Soviet wishes.

Keywords:   Mao Zedong, Stalin, Comintern, WWII, CCP, guerrilla warfare

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