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Law and the Utopian Imagination$
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Austin Sarat, Lawrence Douglas, and Martha Merill Umphrey

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780804790819

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804790819.001.0001

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Globus terraqueus: Cosmopolitan Law and “Fluid Geography” in the Utopian Thinking of Immanuel Kant and Joseph‐Pierre Proudhon

Globus terraqueus: Cosmopolitan Law and “Fluid Geography” in the Utopian Thinking of Immanuel Kant and Joseph‐Pierre Proudhon

Chapter:
Globus terraqueus: Cosmopolitan Law and “Fluid Geography” in the Utopian Thinking of Immanuel Kant and Joseph‐Pierre Proudhon
Source:
Law and the Utopian Imagination
Author(s):

Diane Morgan

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804790819.003.0005

Defining and enforcing what is right tends to lead to a normatively “blueprint” model of justice. By contrast, “cosmopolitan law” can produce a more experimental, «utopian» form of justice. As «cosmopolitan” citizens of a world, we are ‘serially’ indebted to its past and responsible for its future. However, as a community of beings, our relations are challengingly disjunctive; they are not characterised by an expansive, pluralistic identification with others. This ongoing antagonism is mediated by “seriality“(a source of order at play in all aspects of life). “Seriality” necessarily combines us with all forms of life and enjoins us to behave responsibly towards them given the limited natural resources at our disposal. Indeed, it is this ecological injunction, so urgent nowadays, which should inject a compelling force into the “cosmopolitan” series, as identified in Kant's and Proudhon's writings, regarding our needs, rights and duties as inhabitants of this spherical planet.

Keywords:   cosmopolitcs, ecology, hope, peace, seriality, disjunctive judgements

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