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Open SkiesTransparency, Confidence-Building, and the End of the Cold War$
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Peter Jones

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780804790987

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804790987.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 20 September 2021

Open Skies Reborn

Open Skies Reborn

Chapter:
(p.18) 2 Open Skies Reborn
Source:
Open Skies
Author(s):

Peter Jones

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804790987.003.0003

Chapter two recounts how Open Skies was relaunched in 1989. As before, it was a “top-down” initiative, launched by a small group of officials and publicly endorsed by the President with little bureaucratic support. It continued to test a Soviet leader's commitment to mutual coexistence and openness. But there was a key difference; the 1989 proposal was launched as a multilateral one to include all the NATO countries and the Warsaw Pact. Key to this had been the high-level intervention with President Bush of Canadian Prime Minister Brian Mulroney. Arguing that the political and military benefits of Open Skies would best be realized multilaterally, Mulroney exerted influenced the decision to relaunch Open Skies multilaterally. Canada went on to play a significant role in initiating negotiations. In this Canada would be joined by a country on the other side, Hungary, which also saw the benefits of the idea.

Keywords:   Bush, Gorbachev, Mulroney, Open Skies, Confidence-building Measure (CBM), Cold War, Cold War, Verification, Cooperative Aerial Monitoring, Warsaw Pact

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