Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Cities, Business, and the Politics of Urban Violence In Latin America$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Eduardo Moncada

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780804794176

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804794176.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 02 April 2020

Medellin

Medellin

Reshaping Political Order and Criminal Coexistence

Chapter:
(p.55) 3 Medellin
Source:
Cities, Business, and the Politics of Urban Violence In Latin America
Author(s):

Eduardo Moncada

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804794176.003.0003

Chapter abstract: This chapter provides a within-case analysis of contrasting outcomes in the politics of urban violence in Medellin. In the early 1990s disengaged relations between local government and business coupled with fragmented armed territorial control derailed the city’s first participatory political project in response to urban violence. A decade collaborative relations emerged between business and a local government led by mayor Sergio Fajardo, and territorial control shifted into a monopoly under the authority of a former paramilitary leader. This combination helped to successfully sustain a second participatory political project that was used to rebrand Medellin as an emerging global city. The analysis shows that the reality of the Medellin miracle is far more complex than either its political architects or international donors concede, and is emblematic of the significant ways in which the politics of urban violence can reshape political order in major developing world cities.

Keywords:   Medellin, Sergio Fajardo, business, paramilitary, political order, rebrand, global city, territorial control

Stanford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.