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The Long Afterlife of Nikkei Wartime Incarceration$
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Karen M. Inouye

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780804795746

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9780804795746.001.0001

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Canadian Redress as Ambivalent Transnationality

Canadian Redress as Ambivalent Transnationality

Chapter:
(p.91) Three Canadian Redress as Ambivalent Transnationality
Source:
The Long Afterlife of Nikkei Wartime Incarceration
Author(s):
Karen M. Inouye
Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9780804795746.003.0004

Shifting the geographical and cultural scope of the book, Chapter Three looks at Canadian discourses of redress in the year following the publication of Personal Justice Denied (1983). The product of a formal government inquiry, this publication galvanized Nikkei in Canada, who subsequently set about debating how best to pursue redress in that country. Recognizing profound cultural and political differences between their situation and that of Japanese Americans, they engaged in a discourse that shows how Nikkei identity in North America in the 1980s was contested, fragmentary, and at times contradictory, rather than discrete and easy to identify. Rather than produce some kind of artificially unified self-image, Japanese Canadians in pursuit of redress engaged in an ambivalent transnationality that referred to American (and Japanese) precedents even as all of the parties involved recognized the significant differences that attended each main type of Nikkei experience.

Keywords:   Japanese Canadian, The New Canadian, newspapers, imagined communities, Roy Miki, Roy Kiyooka, Maryka Omatsu, transnational, diasporic transnationality

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