Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Literary Primitivism$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ben Etherington

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781503602366

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9781503602366.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 20 September 2021

Primitivism, Decolonization, and World Literature

Primitivism, Decolonization, and World Literature

Chapter:
(p.161) Conclusion Primitivism, Decolonization, and World Literature
Source:
Literary Primitivism
Author(s):

Ben Etherington

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9781503602366.003.0008

The conclusion recapitulates the central claims of the study, especially with regard to the phenomenological notion that primitivism was a “project,” and points to areas for further research. It also discusses in greater depth the politics of primitivism, especially the notion that it had a “decolonial horizon.” This is undertaken through a brief comparative discussion of two accounts of the Haitian revolution written in the 1930s, Guy Endore’s Babouk and C. L. R. James’s The Black Jacobins. It finishes by considering in what respects literary primitivism might be considered an event of “world literature.”

Keywords:   phenomenology, gender, decolonization, world literature, Guy Endore, Babouk, C. L. R. James, The Black Jacobins, Aimé Césaire, Solar Throat Slashed

Stanford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.