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From the Grounds UpBuilding an Export Economy in Southern Mexico$
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Casey Marina Lurtz

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781503603899

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: September 2019

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9781503603899.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 22 November 2019

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
From the Grounds Up
Author(s):

Casey Marina Lurtz

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9781503603899.003.0001

Across the late nineteenth century, Latin American rural economies transformed and expanded to meet the demands of urban and industrial markets in the North Atlantic. In examining these transformations, historians have long failed to register the ways smalltime producers as well as foreign and local elites integrated Latin America into global trade. Yet it is impossible to understand the export boom without understanding all those who produced for market. Neither the liberal policies of Latin American elites nor the capital and connections of migrant investors could absolutely disentail regional participants in the shifting political and economic landscape of the era. From the first years of production, numerous factors constrained commercial investors as they attempted to turn places like the Soconusco into model plantation economies serving global markets. Chief among these was the active participation of local villagers in the self-same global market and the institutions that undergirded it.

Keywords:   Mexico, export boom, globalization, development, Soconusco, elites, popular liberalism, institutions

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