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Manipulating GlobalizationThe Influence of Bureaucrats on Business in China$
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Ling Chen

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781503604797

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9781503604797.001.0001

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Local Policy Making, Globalized Coalitions, and Resource Allocation

Local Policy Making, Globalized Coalitions, and Resource Allocation

Chapter:
(p.62) Chapter 4 Local Policy Making, Globalized Coalitions, and Resource Allocation
Source:
Manipulating Globalization
Author(s):

Ling Chen

Ling Chen

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9781503604797.003.0004

This chapter delves into the coalitional politics of policy making and resource allocation by investigating strategies of city government officials. The chapter examines the patterns of bureaucratic competition between international commerce departments and newly emerged domestic technology departments and their respective business clients, including foreign and domestic firms. I explain the influence of FDI attraction on domestic politics by showing (1) how the overlap between FIEs and exporters shaped the degree of perceived threat and the cohesiveness of the vested interests in international commerce under the rule of fragmented bureaucratic competition and (2) how the existence of large foreign firms strengthened the bargaining power of the vested interest bureaucrats against allocating resources to the domestic technology coalition. The direction and the magnitude of foreign influence, therefore, is filtered and channeled through local bureaucracy.

Keywords:   policy making, resource allocation, bureaucratic competition, fragmented authoritarianism, vested interest, foreign firms, exports

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