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Manipulating GlobalizationThe Influence of Bureaucrats on Business in China$
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Ling Chen

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781503604797

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9781503604797.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 23 September 2021

Making Economic Policies Work

Making Economic Policies Work

Chapter:
(p.154) Chapter 7 Making Economic Policies Work
Source:
Manipulating Globalization
Author(s):

Ling Chen

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9781503604797.003.0007

This chapter summarizes the findings of the book. It draws attention to how global production fragmented or integrated state agencies and businesses, shaped the ways they perceived their interests, and ultimately affected the local political environments for domestic private firms. Compared with other approaches, the theory advanced in this book takes the incentives of local state agencies seriously. It shows that in an authoritarian country where businesses do not have a direct role in policy making, the local bureaucrats, by pursuing their own political and economic interests, can influence the political and economic environment of production. The chapter then broadens out to map major Asian economies in Northeast and Southeast Asia in a comparative picture.

Keywords:   global production, local officials, authoritarian, interests

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