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Brokering Peace in Nuclear EnvironmentsU.S. Crisis Management in South Asia$
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Moeed Yusuf

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781503604858

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9781503604858.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 19 October 2019

The Mumbai Crisis

The Mumbai Crisis

Chapter:
(p.121) 5 The Mumbai Crisis
Source:
Brokering Peace in Nuclear Environments
Author(s):

Moeed Yusuf

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9781503604858.003.0006

This chapter examines the 2008 Mumbai crisis and shows that brokered bargaining characterized crisis behavior of the rivals and the U.S.-led third party. In a situation that could have boiled over given the spectacular nature of the terrorist attacks that triggered the crisis, India, Pakistan, and the United States exhibited an even greater sense of familiarity with the opportunities and limitations associated with the trilateral bargaining framework. Despite threatening military action at times, India relied almost exclusively on the United States to pursue its crisis objectives. Without boxing it in completely, the United States pressured Pakistan and forced it to take actions against terrorists believed to be linked to the attacks, and used this to pacify India. The centrality of the third-party strand of crisis management helps explain the prudence both sides exhibited in avoiding brinkmanship.

Keywords:   Mumbai crisis, crisis behavior, brokered bargaining, third-party mediation, escalation, terrorism, India, Pakistan, United States

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