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The Deepest BorderThe Strait of Gibraltar and the Making of the Modern Hispano-African Borderland$
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Sasha D. Pack

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781503606678

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: May 2019

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9781503606678.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 22 November 2019

Imperial Borders

Imperial Borders

Chapter:
(p.61) 3 Imperial Borders
Source:
The Deepest Border
Author(s):

Sasha D. Pack

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9781503606678.003.0004

This chapter explores various ways that imperial enclaves could project power over their borders. Examples include the increasing power of European consuls in Tangier to adjudicate conflicts between Jews and Muslims throughout Morocco; the processes by which officials in Gibraltar and Melilla asserted control over regional trade networks by protecting smugglers; and the role of French Oran in serving as a landing point for Spanish and Moroccan refugees and dissidents. Taken together, these examples illustrate the formation of a constellation of power in the trans-Gibraltar borderland that curtailed the ability of the Spanish and Moroccan governments to administer their own laws. The chapter ends with a discussion of the crisis of 1898, which set in motion a cooperative effort by Spain, Britain, and France to clearly delineate imperial spheres of influence, producing the Entente Cordiale of 1904.

Keywords:   Gibraltar, Melilla, Tangier, Oran, John Drummond-Hay, Francisco Merry y Colom, Muslim-Jewish Relations, Entente Cordiale, Smuggling

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