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Between Empire and NationMuslim Reform in the Balkans$
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Milena B. Methodieva

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9781503613379

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9781503613379.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 01 July 2022

Homeland, Nation, and Community

Homeland, Nation, and Community

Chapter:
(p.211) 7 Homeland, Nation, and Community
Source:
Between Empire and Nation
Author(s):

Milena B. Methodieva

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9781503613379.003.0008

The chapter explores the emergence of new ideas about community and belonging among Bulgaria’s Muslims. For many reformist Muslims the homeland was the most sacred ideal; it could be Bulgaria, the Ottoman Empire or an abstract place. During the period under consideration “Muslim” was the most common term of self-designation regardless of the Muslims’ background. But at the beginning of the 20th century “Turk” started to acquire wider popularity within certain circles, while an argument between Turks and Tatars provides an opportunity to explore the different perceptions of identity. At the same time Bulgaria’s Muslims became increasingly aware of being part of a larger world in which many of their coreligionists shared similar challenges. The chapter looks specifically at the contacts with Crimean Tatars and the Muslims of Habsburg Bosnia, and visions of Pan Islamic unity. The chapter ends with the reactions to the Young Turk revolution.

Keywords:   homeland, community, patriotism, nationalism, Turks, Tatars, Crimea, Bosnia, Pan Islam, Young Turk revolution

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