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Writing OccupationJewish Émigré Voices in Wartime France$
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Julia Elsky

Print publication date: 2020

Print ISBN-13: 9781503613676

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9781503613676.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

Memory, Language, and Jewish Francophonie

Memory, Language, and Jewish Francophonie

Chapter:
(p.203) Epilogue Memory, Language, and Jewish Francophonie
Source:
Writing Occupation
Author(s):

Julia Elsky

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9781503613676.003.0007

This epilogue theorizes a Jewish Francophonie, looking at the question of Jewishness within the French language among the heirs to the writers in Writing Occupation including Myriam Anissimov, Hélène Cixous, and Cécile Wajsbrot. These writers demonstrate the lasting impact of Jewish multilingualism on writerly identity, in particular in relation to the memory and postmemory of the Shoah and histories of migration. These writers also relate to Yiddish in different ways, from lamenting the disappearance of Yiddish to resisting that trope and embodying what Samuel J. Spinner has called “reading Jewish,” which is related to Jeffrey Shandler’s concept of postvernacular Yiddish. Like the authors studied in Writing Occupation, Anissimov, Cixous, and Wajsbrot shift the paradigms of dominant and dominated cultures to one of immigration and transnational circulation.

Keywords:   Myriam Anissimov, Hélène Cixous, Cécile Wajsbrot, Holocaust memory, Postmemory, Francophonie, Yiddish, Algeria, multilingualism

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