Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Networked NonproliferationMaking the NPT Permanent$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Michal Onderco

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9781503628922

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: January 2022

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9781503628922.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 28 June 2022

“Babes in the Woods”

“Babes in the Woods”

South Africa and the Extension

Chapter:
(p.63) 4 “Babes in the Woods”
Source:
Networked Nonproliferation
Author(s):

Michal Onderco

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9781503628922.003.0005

Chapter 4 discusses the cooperation between the US and South Africa. While US efforts to “co-opt” South Africa can be traced back to late 1994, the cooperation really started only after a meeting between then vice president of South Africa, Thabo Mbeki, and US vice president Al Gore in late February 1995. Mbeki was instrumental in reversing the position of South Africa, which until then favored a green-light rolling extension. Mbeki also overruled his own party, which favored a one-off, short-term extension. By breaking from both his diplomats and his party, Mbeki created a situation that helped to break the anti-extension block within the Non-Aligned Movement and pave the position toward extension. In this chapter, I scrutinize the domestic process within South Africa in late 1994 and early 1995 as well as the cooperation with the US and the interactions between Mbeki and Gore.

Keywords:   South Africa, nonproliferation, nuclear weapons, 1995, Albert Gore, Thabo Mbeki, DIRCO, Abdul Minty, Peter Goosen, United States

Stanford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.