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Networked NonproliferationMaking the NPT Permanent$
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Michal Onderco

Print publication date: 2021

Print ISBN-13: 9781503628922

Published to Stanford Scholarship Online: January 2022

DOI: 10.11126/stanford/9781503628922.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM STANFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.stanford.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Stanford University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in SSO for personal use.date: 28 June 2022

“This Is What Happens When You Become Greedy”

“This Is What Happens When You Become Greedy”

Egypt’s Intervention

Chapter:
(p.82) 5 “This Is What Happens When You Become Greedy”
Source:
Networked Nonproliferation
Author(s):

Michal Onderco

Publisher:
Stanford University Press
DOI:10.11126/stanford/9781503628922.003.0006

This chapter studies the cooperation with Egypt, which allowed the US to co-opt Arab countries and diminish opposition to the extension among the nonaligned countries. The chapter will focus on Egypt’s diplomacy related to Israel’s nuclear program prior to the 1995 NPT Review Conference, the discussions within Egypt held between the Council presidency and the Egyptian foreign ministry (who held opposite preferences, driven by different motivations), and then, ultimately, the negotiations in New York leading to the adoption of the Resolution on the Middle East, one of the key documents that emerged from the conference. For procedural reasons, the US had to enter into negotiations with Egypt on the latter’s acquiescence to the extension of the NPT without a vote. The price Egypt exacted for this was a resolution on the Middle East, negotiated bilaterally between Egypt and the US.

Keywords:   Egypt, nonproliferation, nuclear weapons, Israel, MEWMDFZ, United States, US, Amr Moussa

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